Pocket Gardens

I love New York, but you have heard that from me before.

A few of decades ago New Yorkers grew tired of being the concrete jungle and decided to make some changes.  They cleaned up their neighborhoods, cracked down on crime, and developed initiatives to make their city more hospitable.20180502 IMG_2334 7D gardens smOne of those initiatives suggested by then candidate John Lindsay first appeared in a white paper he wrote, and which appeared in the Times.  It suggested an innovative approach for bringing more green space to congested areas by establishing tiny gardens and play areas he called “vest-pocket” gardens.20180518 IMG_0288 6D smMaintaining hundreds of gardens and playgrounds would soon become a heavy financial burden to a city undergoing difficult times.  By the 1970’s GreenThumb was initiated.  This project converted derelict and vacant lots into beautiful green spaces by the hands and dedication of private volunteers.20180527 IMG_0624 6D smThese community gardens, now managed by neighborhood residents, provide spaces for growing flowers and vegetables, offer small spaces for quiet engagement with nature.20180527 IMG_0630 6D eastside com garden smGreenThumb gardens are located in all five boroughs in the city. According to the NYC parks department,

“Some are green spaces meant for relaxation and as a community meeting space, others are full–fledged farms, and many are a mix of the types. The volunteer gardeners are the backbone of our program and are of diverse ages and backgrounds.”IMG_4418 teresaPrivate individuals and corporations have also joined in the effort, donating spaces or opening private space to the public.20170503 IMG_9254 7D S17-70 citizen working in greenacre park smI am quite taken by these quaint little parks, that afford tiny nooks of calming space within The City.

However, I particularly love that the citizens of New York make these possible. They care for them, groom them, plant in them, all under the loose oversight of NYC Parks.IMG_5611 small garden smThinking of places I have lived, citizens usually rely on the government for such initiatives.  This kind of personal commitment to the betterment of their city is one of the things that makes NYC work.

So, I ask, what does your community need that its citizens could provide?  Is it worth writing a white paper?20180527 IMG_0623 6D

3 thoughts on “Pocket Gardens

Add yours

  1. I LOVE this post! I visited one of these on the Upper West Side when they had a Tulip Festival…it was so beautiful, and the neighbors were so friendly. You could really see the pride and care that they had for these gardens. By the way, I just figured out why I never got notified of a new post from you guys, so I got that taken care of after adjusting some settings – looking forward to reading more (and KNOWING when you’ve written more! ;))

    Liked by 1 person

  2. It really does take a village, doesn’t it? I remember reading an interview with Nora Ephron where she commented that so few people realize the city is made up of a series of small neighborhoods. These pocket gardens definitely prove her point!

    And I love that you can find a waterfall in the middle of Midtown Manhattan 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s